Blue Flower

From stomach-churning salves like facial masks made with bird poop to practices that amount to nothing less than self-inflicted torture—breaking and stretching bones—there are no boundaries in the pursuit of beauty, nor is there cultural immunity. All over the globe, our vain species engages in unsavory and often diamond coral 推薦 painful beautifying regimens.

 

Improving the Epidermis … with Entrails and Excrement

 

In the quest for beauty, it seems that everything that’s part of or comes out of an animal is fair game. Placenta treatments are said to keep the Hollywood glitterati gorgeous. Sheep are often, but not always, the source. One Los Angeles dermatologist says he procures placenta from a Russian maternity ward. The afterbirth is treated to prevent contamination and disease transmission. While smearing the remnants of an organ that was once part of a uterine wall on your face may seem extreme, placenta purveyors say it restores elasticity, eliminates toxins, and leaves skin glowing.

 

Epidermal etiquette is anything but orthodox in Japan where women are renowned for their clear, porcelain-like complexions. Said to be a centuries-old Geisha secret, facials and creams made from nightingale droppings have recently developed a following in the United States. The bird poop products got a boost when Closer magazine reported that Victoria Beckham gave the fecal facial a try while Yumei好用 on a trip to Japan and now uses a bird-dropping cream to keep her skin blemish-free. The guanine enzyme in the excrement purportedly cleans, brightens, and exfoliates. The facial is not (quite) as nauseating as it sounds; the songbird droppings are sterilized and powdered before being made into a medicinal-smelling paste that costs some $200 at posh Manhattan and Beverly Hills spas.

 

To fight aging, Japanese women practice another unusual ritual: drinking collagen. Derived from pigs, chickens, and cows, the carnivorous beverage can be made from powder or bought ready-to-drink in a can for $2 a pop. Using collagen-infused creams and injecting the fibrous protein to flesh out wrinkles and lips is nothing new in the West, but by ingesting concentrated collagen, the theory goes, the skin is getting a boost from the inside. Foods with added collagen are also popular in Japan and are often advertised on restaurant menus.

 

Collagen drinkers, however, have nothing on Demi Moore. In her quest for the fountain of youth, she has left no stone—or swamp—unturned. The forty-seven-year old traveled to Austria to be sucked by leeches. She said that four reenex cps leeches fed on her blood until satiated and then, off they rolled. The creatures, she claims, emit a detoxifying enzyme.